Bringing Back Balance To Your Game Episode.052

“How much?” he asks as he holds the jeweled pendant in his hands in front of the drooling merchant, anxious for a big sell today.  “For you, I will part with such a rare item for three quarters of a hundred thousand.”  The man looks up with an emotionless expression on his face. “Fine,” he replies and places a heavy chest on the counter with a thud and a deafened jingle from within.  The merchant wets his lips at the sight, never having seen so much money at one time…and all for him.  He looks up to thank the buyer, offering his hand, but his shop is completely empty.  The little bell above his door never once rang when he left.  “How did he move so quickly?” thought the merchant, and then shrugged his shoulders as he eyed the chest and worked at the latch to open the container.  Outside moments later, bystanders heard a shriek of horror and pain from within the shop.  By the time someone investigated, they found nothing more than a pool of liquid beside the opened chest, a burning sizzle rising from within the container that had a spring-loaded acid trap, now spent.  The only one who knew of the mysterious man’s existence was now dead, but the world would know of him very soon.

One thing that always baffled me are players who find enjoyment for long periods of time playing characters who are clearly overpowered for the game in rpgs.  While it is very satisfying and rewarding when you work hard to build a character from very little to a very powerful character, the latter half should still be as challenging, just on another spectrum.  Challenges, obstacles, or bumps in the road make up any storyline and create interest.  If you were to take out those setbacks or achievements that need to be accomplished, then you are living essentially a “slice of life” story where it is merely a segment of one’s life in everyday living that just happens to have little to no difficulties.  We may live ordinary lives every day, but they are still filled with challenges both great and small.  We can think that life would be so much better if we lived in a utopia where there was no work and all play, it would lose its value and enjoyment.  If we don’t mix things up, we lose interest.  Those living in paradise eventually get used to living day to day there and it loses the charm.

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So what brings on the charm of being so powerful in an rpg you find little to no challenge in each session?  It may be fun to enjoy dominating an encounter, rolling extremely high numbers (ridiculously high, in fact), but just how far can the enjoyment of that go?  Sooner or later, repetition is going to sink in, and you will find yourself going through the motions rather than the joy.  The excited rolls of big numbers will eventually become “why bother rolling?”  As a GM, it becomes more difficult to find challenges for players who prefer to become more powerful than they know what to do with.  Generally the two areas of power a character can get are money and equipment.  The former brings the latter unless you accidentally give them the opportunity to acquire the equipment.  I find that if you are able to limit the amount of gold and reward what they get as they progress, you will be able to control their power.  This is much easier said than done.  In fact, there are charts in most guides for GMs explaining how much reward you should give a group depending on their level (not just fantasy rpgs but in general).  It’s so easy to just dump a large amount of gold at the players.  When they get powerful enough to hunt dragons, for example, or attack corporate companies that have Swiss bank accounts, that’s when you need to be on you’re A Game.  But let’s say you made a mistake and allowed the party to either have too much gear or money too soon.  How do you bring it back to a level playing field without you having to tell them point blank you need to remove some things from the game?  Here are a few suggestions to get your brain storming started:

  • Curse Items – This is for fantasy settings when things like magical gear are available. It won’t be as critical in modern day or future settings.  However, in a setting where they are present, cursed items can really help bring characters back on a level playing field although it is only a temporary fix.  If they acquired their gear by money, they probably still have a ton left.  However, keep in mind that curse items that cause your gear to go mundane is extremely powerful and should be in a logical area.  It can also cause your players to up and quit the game (had one do that in a fit of rage).

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  • Give them opportunity to buy cool things that are essentially worthless. Strongholds are the best that come to mind.  These can produce gold, but not as quickly or as much as the wealth they have on hand.  Building structures takes lots of workers, tons of material, and constant protection until it can properly defend itself.  Once built, then it takes time for people to move in and be taxed.  Tax them too high and a GM can choose they begin leaving.  Let them build their own traveling vessel like a ship.  Just because the price “in the book” says a value doesn’t mean that is how much it is.  YOU are in charge of your world.  It’s your baby.  Different parts of the real world have varied prices depending on inflation.  Pure economics will dictate and allow you to choose the values of things.

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  • The countries they are in can hold a ton of options on reducing gold or valuables. It can be a highly taxed environment that does an outstanding job of keeping an eye on everyone through scrying means.  There could be a form of IRS that is a collection of wizards working for the king who use their powers to spy on every single person in the kingdom and makes notes of who pays and who doesn’t, then sends a powerful group of assassins or adventurers after them to collect or soften up.
    • The country could be very anti-magic to the point the entire country (or a large part of it) is domed with an anti-magic field, rendering their weapons mundane. Instead of the entire area being a neutral area, you could introduce anti-magical weapons.  These pieces of equipment could be enchanted with a means to negate the enchantment of the weapons the party uses.  Armor could essentially work as damage reductions, negating the magical bonus the weapons have, and their anti-magical weapons could cut through their enchanted armor.
    • Not every country uses monies to buy and sell things. Bartering could be an option, and when they have to come up with something valuable enough to acquire that very expensive magical item, it may be a challenge.  Often bartering doesn’t have a price or value.  It is based on what the two need.  The man with the weapon may have a need for a cow, but they are in the desert where cows are extremely hard to find.  The country may be against the country where they acquired the gold and refuse to accept or exchange it, calling the coins “tainted.”

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  • Another possibility is for actual theft. This is a bit tougher to pull off because just about any gaming party is by nature extremely paranoid because they know whatever they are capable of doing other people are just as aware and capable.  But not everyone is at the same level of skill as the party is.  Just because they are around the 4th level (or whatever equivalent in the system) doesn’t mean everyone in the world is the same.  Much more prevalent in a more realistic, living campaign world where the party can and will encounter all kinds of danger, they can often be reminded that the world is a dangerous place.  Just because they are overly cautious doesn’t mean they are completely safe.  As a GM, you can compare the situation to hackers in modern day where no company can guarantee their systems are safe.  No matter how careful the party is in keeping an eye out, if someone wants your stuff bad enough, they are going to take it.  This can lead to having a reoccurring villain or villains who continue to thwart the party as they try to catch them.
  • Finally, always keep track of encumbrance when they acquire too much gold.  Carrying 150,000 gold pieces takes up A LOT of space!  If they then choose to put it in a bank, it’s not like modern times where we can wire money from bank to bank.  Where it is held is where your money can be accessed.  Then you have the threat of it being stolen.  They could put the money in a dungeon they have cleared, but then it’s a cleared, unprotected dungeon.  Putting the gold all on a wagon is fine, but think about that for a second: a wagon filled with gold jingling anywhere is bound to attract constant attention.  They definitely can’t carry it all on their bodies without being highly unencumbered, too.

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It is tempting to reward your players too quickly and by too much.  This is especially the case after the party accomplishes a very difficult task, and you feel that they should get a considerable award for their achievement.  Be very careful with awarding treasure and rewards on the fly!  I can’t stress this enough.  If you know something is coming up, prepare yourself beforehand by making a list of things they will acquire if they complete a task.  However, if you are suddenly working on-the-fly, making things up off the cuff because the players are going a different direction than you had planned, there is nothing wrong with you making a note to the players the reward will be given later.  Yes they may be belly-aching because they want to know now, but leave it as a cliffhanger if you want.  “After vanquishing the beholder and gaining access to its secret chamber, you open the door to see….” And make them wait until next session.  It will make them anxious to come back to find out, and it will give you enough time to clearly think of a fair and balanced reward for them.

Take your time, think things through, and proceed with caution and wisdom instead of being zealous or careless.

Until next time, lie about your dice roll as much as you can get away with.  Thanks for stopping by.

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